Alt-toolboxes for tradies
Solutions to modern problems
Stanley 4-in-1 toolbox
Stanley 4-in-1 toolbox
 
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The old rigid or metal toolbox is rapidly becoming a thing of the past, with backpacks and other soft-side storage taking over
HNN Sources
It's no secret that, for most trades, the number of tools each tradie needs to tote around increases every year. Whether its hand tools, power tools, or measuring and inspection tools, designers and manufacturers keep coming up with better ways to accomplish construction and maintenance tasks.

With great power comes ... well, the need to tote around a lot of gear, actually.

While for many the traditional style of toolbox continues to work well (pull up in ute/van, put tools in box, go to work), for many, especially those who find themselves working on multi-unit dwelling construction, tool transportation has become a bigger issue.

Depending on the task at hand, there are two potential paths for this need breed of tradies to follow: they can go for the big, pull-along toolchest, which means they can take everything with them, or they can go for more easily transportable solutions, such as backpacks.

Backpacks have been growing in popularity in part because they've become so much a part of our culture - it's what you carry your sporting kit in, your groceries, photography equipment, and so forth - and because they are a great solution when your workday begins with a kilometre walk, followed by a long climb up scaffolding and ladders to reach your worksite.

What HNN is presenting here might be called the "alt-toolboxes", some well thought out solutions to new ways for tradies to keep their tools about on the different sorts of work environments they encounter.
Veto Pro Pac's Tech Pac

One of the best made and best designed (and more expensive) solutions, this backpack is specifically designed for use by tradies who need to walk a fair distance to the jobsite, or who need to work doing tasks such as servicing equipment on a ladder or elevated platform. The backpack has 56 pockets for tools in total, and is designed for quick and easy access to all of those pockets.

The design was tested in the field, and resulted from a great deal of research.

According to the designer of the pack, Roger Brouard:
We wanted to see first hand how tradesmen in the field deal with those conditions, so I spent weeks with them on the job observing them - from looking at OSHA standards of three points of contact on ladders, hauling tools up with a rope, to the need for a backpack that would fit through cages and stand up when being used, to a backpack that is comfortable and won't get wet when placed down in wet or muddy conditions.

Like better hiking packs, the pack features a thermo-formed EVA padded back panel that helps cushion the load, and also provides structural stability. A padded load displacing shoulder strap system with multiple adjustment strap points makes it easy to wear the pack for long periods. It's designed to not tip over when stood upright on the ground, and is the right size to fit through safety cages on construction sites.
Veto Pro Pac's Tech Pac
Milwaukee Jobsite Backpack

While this is a smaller pack, with just 35 pockets, its designed to suit most builders and construction workers. It features a total of 35 pockets, and six elastic straps to hold tools. On the inside it has a large pocket in the centre, two medium pockets to either side of that, a further 10 small pockets, and three zippered storage pockets. On the exterior, there are two side pockets, and another zippered pocket on the back, as well as four straps. Finally there is one very large pocket on the back, which could hold a hard hat.
Milwaukee Jobsite Backpack
Stanley Fatmax 4-in-1 Mobile Work Station

This is a unique product from Stanley. Packed up for transport, it's the usual tall and wide toolbox we're all used to. Deployed for use, however, it transforms into a four-area tool access stand, including a toolbox, parts bin, portable flat tray, and an oversized lower bin for items such as power tools. It comes with its own built-in wheels, and includes a telescoping handle. The designers even thought to include a V-groove in the top of the work station, making it easy to hold materials such as lumber and pipes steady for cutting. The whole box of tools can be locked at a single point.
Stanley 4-in-1 toolbox
Stanley Fatmax Tool Back Pack

With 50 pockets, the Stanley offering provides extensive flexibility for storage. It also features an internal sleeve for tool storage that can be lifted out of the backpack to provide ease of access to a wide selection of the tools. The backpack has a separate pocket for the storage of a laptop, or power tool.
Stanley Fatmax Tool Back Pack
Irwin Centre Tote Tool Bag

Something like a combination of a backpack and a more traditional toolbox, This tote bag offers 42 pockets for storage, along with a separate power tool holder. It features an open design that makes it easy to find and access tools. Comes with a padded shoulder strap, making it easier to carry tools and leave hands free.
Irwin tote bag
Milwaukee Bucket Organiser Bag

A great idea from Milwaukee, this is a like a tool belt for a bucket. It's a nylon belt that wraps around a standard bucket, and provides storage via 30 exterior pockets, plus two large zippered pockets.
Milwaukee Bucket Organiser Bag
Milwaukee Bucketless Organiser Bag

Like the above, but without the need for a bucket. Provides an additional 20 storage pockets, bringing the total to 50. Includes a hammer holder that keeps the hammer upright, and easy to grab a hold of.
Milwaukee Tool's bucket bag
HNN Sources


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